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Showing posts from April, 2020

Jesus the Door Sunday

This Sunday, like all fourth Sundays of Easter, is Good Shepherd Sunday. This is the one Sunday we are invited to take note of what Kenneth Bailey[1] describes as the ongoing Good Shepherd tradition with scripture. As I have said before this tradition begins with 23rd Psalm which uses the ordinary work of a shepherd to describe how God seeks out the lost sheep, brings them home, protects them, and provides all they need to flourish. Bailey says this basic tradition is reinterpreted again and again, including by Jesus in today’s reading from John 10. This is not just Jesus’ reinterpretation. It is also John’s. He sets his version within the story of the man born blind who was healed, was then cast out by the Jewish leaders, and then became a disciple and was included in Jesus own community of followers. Everything Jesus says relates back to those very concrete acts. In this version Jesus is the shepherd who lies across the gate at night and risks his own life to protect the sheep and is…

Eyes Wide Open in the New Normal

This sermon can be listened to hereGate Pa –  3rd Sunday in Easter - Year A -2020 Readings: Psalm -                        Psalm: 116:1-4, 12-19 First Reading -             Acts 2:14, 36-41
Second Reading -       1 Peter 1:17-23 Gospel -                       Luke 24:13-35 What I want to say: We are in a new normal – getting used to being church in some different and creative ways. Today’s gospel invites us to think about how we recognise the risen Jesus in the ordinary acts of gathering for meals and living in our bubbles. What I want to happen: Invite people to the story of this lockdown what would it include? -           What are your hopes in all this? -           How are you feeling? -           Is this something you can share with others -           Or just in prayer? -  what stories and passages from scripture come to mind as you think about your experience over the last 5 or so weeks, and as you look ahead. -  how risen Christ is being made known without our homes in our ordinary act of brea…